My Hero Academia: Eastern Capes and Tights

My Hero Academia: Eastern Capes and Tights

My Hero Academia

              I know I’m a bit late to this, considering that I just went binging on a whole season’s worth of anime tonight, but by no means does that mean that what I’m going to write about in here will have of less value. Now, on with this article! First of all, say what you want about the Japanese, but they sure know how to make things amped up to 11, and My Hero Academia, one of the newest sensations in the world of manga and anime lives up to that reputation. To be honest, I initially paid no heed to all the updates and news that I occasionally see about this series for a lot of reasons, mainly with committing with what could be a long-term engagement as is the case for serial television. But, given the combination of boredom and procrastination, I ended up throwing all those cares away when I watched My Hero Academia.

My Hero Academia

              The thing is that another reason that I didn’t even pay any attention to this series when it started popping up on sites and social media earlier was because it’s about superheroes. If you have been following my articles, you would know how much I have grown weary – and honestly, somewhat repelled – by the whole capes and tights fare. So, knowing that My Hero Academia is a series about superheroes didn’t help a single bit in alleviating those feelings. That is, until I saw the whole first season earlier. Now, I did mention that the series lives up to the reputation when it comes to quality, and I honestly do stand by that statement. My Hero Academia is an enjoyable watch, if only for the very beautifully animated fight scenes it contains. Also, I will have to say that I found it a huge relief to discover that it really is not a superhero title. Yes, a majority of its characters are made up of individuals with powers that they either use to save people or do some of that old fashioned evil, but it does not by any means follow any of the exhausting bullshit of American superhero properties. For one, each and every character in the show, from the minor players up to the main characters, has at least an interesting quality in them. That is to say, each has a unique look to them, as opposed to the usual superhero template where one character looks more or less the same, save for a tweak on the color scheme here or a cape and cowl there.

My Hero Academia

              And, of course, there’s the whole way the plot of My Hero Academia plays out. Had it been your usual superhero series, it would’ve just involved a main character facing off some villain over and over again. Instead, it follows the tradition of shonen manga/anime (if you don’t know what I’m talking about, then Google it). That’s what sets the series apart from just being a superhero series. A more appropriate way to describe it is by saying it’s a shonen series that just happens to have superheroes as its motif.

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