Truly Super

Truly Super

Super

              Of course, the Kick-Ass movie has achieved a certain level of indelibility in the world of films by now, especially if we’re talking about the first one that came out. As for the sequel that came out just a year or two too late, well, let’s just say it goes to show how the first movie was such a success that it was allowed to be made. Don’t get me wrong, though: the Kick-Ass 2 wasn’t that bad; it just didn’t have as much impact as the first one. Now, given the fame and, of course, heaps of dollars the franchise has given its creators, it’s no wonder that Mark Millar has made it his own holy crusade to turn the comic book medium into his personal movie tie-in merchandise factory. Going back to Kick-Ass, I don’t think I’d be wrong when I say that one of its main pulls – its selling point – aside from the outrageous and sometimes dark humor it has is the fact that it prides itself as possessing a level of realism that other superhero movies don’t, or at least at one point or another fans viewed it as having such. Now, I won’t lie: I was one of those dumb nut bags who thought that way. That is, until I encountered the criminally underrated independent movie that is Super. Then, I finally came to my senses and saw how stupid I was. Kick-Ass’ supposed realism is only skin-deep: it’s only realistic as far as the characters don’t have any superhuman abilities for the most part, nothing more. That’s not saying much considering there are tons of properties out there that aren’t realistic yet lacking a superpower (a certain gruff cash cow dressed like a bat comes to mind). So, yeah, I could chalk it up to the mere fact that I wrongly equated blood and guts and cusses to be tantamount to realism. Mea culpa, and thank you, Super, for pulling me out of that crap shoot.

Super

              Now, Super, as I said is a criminally underrated movie, and that’s primarily because of how the whole marketing system works. First, it came out prior to Kick-Ass, but as we all know, the latter was released by a huge corporation and thus was more exposed to the public. Hey, the more theaters a movie is shown, the better chance it has at successfully making a profit. In any case, Super is one hell of a movie that actually, legitimately shows realism within the superhero genre. It’s about a pretty depressed and mentally unstable main character that decides to vent by donning some tights and making crime shut up. Unlike Kick-Ass, though, you won’t think it’s cool or even absurdly funny when he does this; you’ll just feel empathy and say, “there is seriously something wrong with this guy.” And, instead of having a prepubescent killing machine for a sidekick, we get Ellen Page’s character, who gets her sick kicks and panty wet with superheroes. Now, that isn’t much of an indicator for realism, but seeing her head blown off with a magnum is. All I’ll say is you should watch the movie and see how realism actually works in the world of superheroes.

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